13 True Stories Behind Edgar Allan Poe's Terror Tales

Biography.com

One hundred and sixty-six years ago today, Edgar Allan Poe died a mysterious death. The curator of the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond, Virginia takes a look at 13 of his horror stories that were based on reality. Click here to read.

Articles

Journey through the Richmond Poe knew with this collection of true accounts from Poe's life in the city. Chapters cover such topics as Poe's celebrated six-mile swim in the James River, Poe's meeting with Lafayette, Poe's solution to the mystery of the chess-playing automaton, and Poe's wedding. The book is richly illustrated with 51 black-and-white photographs.

128 pages, paperback

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Edgar Allan Poe's Richmond: The Raven in the River City

One of the most popular poems in the English language, Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” (1845) has thrilled generations of readers. In 1882, the Anglo-American artist James Carling decided to produce the definite series of illustrations for the poem. Carling’s bizarre images explore the darkest recesses of Poe’s masterpiece, its hidden symbolism, and its strange beauty. Although the series remained unpublished at the time of the artist’s early death in 1887, the drawings reemerged fifty years later when they entered the collection of the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond, Virginia where they lined the blood-red walls of a Raven Room dedicated to their display. For the first time, The Raven Illustrations of James Carling: Poe’s Classic in Vivid View, written by Poe Museum Curator Christopher Semtner, reproduces the entire series in full color and tells the story behind these haunting artworks.

Paperback, 128 pages

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The Raven Illustrations of James Carling

Books

This full-color catalog of the Poe Museum's exhibit "Poe in Comics" details the history of Edgar Allan Poe's presence in comic books and graphic novels.
 Paperback, 72 pages

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Images of America: Edgar Allan Poe in Richmond

13 Haunting Facts About Edgar Allan Poe's Death

Biography.com

One hundred and sixty-five years ago on October 7, 1849, Edgar Allan Poe died a mysterious death. Christopher P. Semtner, curator of the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond, VA, offers 13 facts about the circumstances surrounding his untimely demise. Click here to read.

Click here to visit Chris Semtner's Amazon author page.

The Incredible Mr. Poe: Comic Book Adaptations of Edgar Allan Poe

Add Some Mystery to Your Summer Vacation

The Crime Writers' Chronicle

Have you ever wondered what Poe's boyhood homes looked like or how the minister who performed Poe's wedding ceremony looked? Here is your chance to follow in Poe's footsteps by seeing the faces and places he knew during some of the most important years of his life. This book, written on behalf of the Poe Museum, contains nearly two hundred of the Poe Museum's rarely seen photographs, prints, and paintings of the people and places Poe knew during his many years in Richmond. A part of Arcadia Publishing's popular Images of America series, Edgar Allan Poe in Richmond is an exploration of Poe's world, how it influenced him, and how he influenced it.
Paperback, 128 pages

Click here to purchase.

Late one October night, a phone call awoke the director of the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond, Virginia. The anonymous caller said he would reveal the whereabouts of the missing bust of Edgar Allan Poe if the director would read to him Poe’s poem “Spirits of the Dead.” Click here to read.

Click here to read reviews of Chris Semtner's books on Goodreads.